Romanians and Bulgarians to join the UK workforce

Romanians and Bulgarians will now be allowed to freely move to the UK as immigration controls have been lifted.

Until now, there have been restrictions on workers from the Eastern European countries coming to work in the UK. However, now these controls, which have been in place since 2007, have been removed, it will be possible for workers from these countries to live and work in the UK.

It is hoped that Romanian and Bulgarian workers will contribute to the UK economy through employment and expenditure. Wages in the UK greatly exceed those in Eastern Europe, attracting quality workers to the UK.

However, many MPs oppose the move, calling for a further five year extension to the immigration restrictions for people from these countries. They say that the UK is yet to recover from 2008’s recession and that it will put unnecessary pressure on the limited job vacancies for UK citizens.

Workers from the UK have the freedom to work almost anywhere in the EU. Migration in the EU is not uncommon, with Spain and France among the most popular destinations for UK citizens seeking work abroad.

Common job roles for immigrant workers in the UK include labouring, table waiting in restaurants and kitchen roles, though it is hoped that good salaries in the UK will attract skilled workers from these countries, including doctors and lawyers.

Opponents of the lift in immigration controls say that as many as a quarter of a million Bulgarians and Romanians could enter the UK in the next five years, but the Bulgarian ambassador has predicted that just 8,000 Bulgarians will seek work in the UK.

Anyone living in the UK has the opportunity to work in many other countries in the EU, and for many jobs it is vital that the worker learns the native language of their country of choice. With the addition of Romanian and Bulgarian workers in the UK workforce, it may also be beneficial to learn Romanian and Bulgarian for smoother integration in the workplace.

Read more about the lifted restrictions on Romanian and Bulgarian immigration>>

Romanians and Bulgarians will now be allowed to freely move to the UK as immigration controls have been lifted.

Until now, there have been restrictions on workers from the Eastern European countries coming to work in the UK. However, now these controls, which have been in place since 2007, have been removed, it will be possible for workers from these countries to live and work in the UK.

It is hoped that Romanian and Bulgarian workers will contribute to the UK economy through employment and expenditure. Wages in the UK greatly exceed those in Eastern Europe, attracting quality workers to the UK.

However, many MPs oppose the move, calling for a further five year extension to the immigration restrictions for people from these countries. They say that the UK is yet to recover from 2008’s recession and that it will put unnecessary pressure on the limited job vacancies for UK citizens.

Workers from the UK have the freedom to work almost anywhere in the EU. Migration in the EU is not uncommon, with Spain and France among the most popular destinations for UK citizens seeking work abroad.

Common job roles for immigrant workers in the UK include labouring, table waiting in restaurants and kitchen roles, though it is hoped that good salaries in the UK will attract skilled workers from these countries, including doctors and lawyers.

Opponents of the lift in immigration controls say that as many as a quarter of a million Bulgarians and Romanians could enter the UK in the next five years, but the Bulgarian ambassador has predicted that just 8,000 Bulgarians will seek work in the UK.

Anyone living in the UK has the opportunity to work in many other countries in the EU, and for many jobs it is vital that the worker learns the native language of their country of choice. With the addition of Romanian and Bulgarian workers in the UK workforce, it may also be beneficial to learn Romanian and Bulgarian for smoother integration in the workplace.

Read more about the lifted restrictions on Romanian and Bulgarian immigration>>

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-25549715

Romanians and Bulgarians will now be allowed to freely move to the UK as immigration controls have been lifted.

Until now, there have been restrictions on workers from the Eastern European countries coming to work in the UK. However, now these controls, which have been in place since 2007, have been removed, it will be possible for workers from these countries to live and work in the UK.

It is hoped that Romanian and Bulgarian workers will contribute to the UK economy through employment and expenditure. Wages in the UK greatly exceed those in Eastern Europe, attracting quality workers to the UK.

However, many MPs oppose the move, calling for a further five year extension to the immigration restrictions for people from these countries. They say that the UK is yet to recover from 2008’s recession and that it will put unnecessary pressure on the limited job vacancies for UK citizens.

Workers from the UK have the freedom to work almost anywhere in the EU. Migration in the EU is not uncommon, with Spain and France among the most popular destinations for UK citizens seeking work abroad.

Common job roles for immigrant workers in the UK include labouring, table waiting in restaurants and kitchen roles, though it is hoped that good salaries in the UK will attract skilled workers from these countries, including doctors and lawyers.

Opponents of the lift in immigration controls say that as many as a quarter of a million Bulgarians and Romanians could enter the UK in the next five years, but the Bulgarian ambassador has predicted that just 8,000 Bulgarians will seek work in the UK.

Anyone living in the UK has the opportunity to work in many other countries in the EU, and for many jobs it is vital that the worker learns the native language of their country of choice. With the addition of Romanian and Bulgarian workers in the UK workforce, it may also be beneficial to learn Romanian and Bulgarian for smoother integration in the workplace.

Read more about the lifted restrictions on Romanian and Bulgarian immigration>>

Learn to speak Romanian with Language Advantage>>

Learn to speak Bulgarian with Language Advantage>>

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Photo by Andrea Lainé

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